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Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 27 August 2013
in Water on the Fire · 0 Comments

One method - many names!

It has lots of names and just as many origins- the act of wrapping the first bite of hose back on itself (about 1.8m) and continuing to wrap until there's about 1m left.

This is commonly called the Cleveland Hose Load, the Round About Hose Load, the Garden Lay etc etc - we're not certain of it's origin however the Cleveland State Forest fire fighters were said to employ the concept for deploying hose at wild fires (great idea!!!).

What we are certain about is it's great! Especially when used in conjunction with an initial flaked hose, as it's possible to stretch and coil 2 lengths of hose just as quickly as the ground between the water supply and the fire can be covered.

We are often asked why we don't just have two packs holding coiled hose and not bother with the flaked hose pack, which on face-value- having two hoses rapidly deployed in a tight area sounds like a good thing- but it's not, or at least we don't think so.

For all its amazing benefits the Cleveland Hose Load has a few short comings which are inherent to the nature of lay-flat hose.

  1. Hose stored in the Cleveland Hose Load should not be run out from it's coiled position until it's full of water- this is because it will twist as it unravels from the coil and when the water is introduced the nozzle/branch will untwist. For this reason the line cannot be advanced until it's full of water.
  2. When deployed in the right position (near to the fire) the Cleveland Hose Load is easily advanced from its tight coil into the burning environment. However if two Cleveland Hose Loads are deployed together too far away, then the ease-of-advancement is burnt up in the distance between the supply and the fire. Then on entry, we are back to the original problem of lots of heavy hose outside.

To solve these problems we have developed a second pack (Lay Pack) designed to cover the distance between the water supply and the coiled hose.

When the two packs are used together, the distance between the fire and supply can be covered in either a forward or reverse direction (depending on the job) and hose deployed into a coil from the Attack Pack can be advanced into the burning environment.

For scenarios where there's a lay flat hose already positioned for each hydrant we have developed the Compack - it too stores and deploys the Cleveland Hose Load in one movement and is stored in more of a square shaped pack so it can fit in traditional fire hose cabinets.

The benefits of a coiled hose deployed in a lift lobby or stairwell environment far outweigh the current hose-rack flaked hoses as it can be deployed almost instantly and does not need to be stretched up and back in limited spaces.

  1. In this scenario the Attack Packs holding the coil are deployed near to the fire.

  2. Where the Lay Packs have been stretched up or down the stairs, to or from the water supply.

 

 

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Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 17 August 2013
in Water on the Fire · 0 Comments

Don't worry! We're big fans of the work that has been pioneered by a few very keen and extremely competent individuals who may all speak different languages yet agree that there's a better way than "Big Fire = Big Water".

But... What is the point of learning all these fantastic techniques- if you cannot get water on the fire quickly and reliably due to hose tangles, kinks and catch points?

'We have procedures' is something we hear - however when quizzed further, more often than not the procedures are "get hose out" - not how to lay hose. What if the usual crew isn't working together? What if a multilingual crew is thrust together on an oil-rig or cruise ship?

Our aim isn't to change anything- we simply hope to add value with some purpose built packs.

For example the Lay Pack is blue because it stretches water between the water supply and the Attack Pack. The Attack Pack is red because it contains the hose that will attack the fire.

First and second arriving fire fighters now know without any words spoken that 60m or 200ft of hose is ready to be laid and who has what role based on the pack they're carrying.

After consultation with fire fighters in Australia, the Mid East, Europe and the USA we have come to the conclusion that when laying hose what's important is:

  • The distance is covered once by the fire fighters - maximum twice
  • Hose is laid only once - not deployed and then bundled up and redeployed
  • Enough hose is deployed - ready to advance into the fire without friction or catch-points causing delays

 

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Keeping an Open Mind

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 21 July 2013
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

As a pioneer of 3D Firefighting tactics in Australia (since 1997) I have been privileged to see the benefits this approach has delivered to my colleagues as well as the people we serve. Along with increasing the safety of firefighters, the 3D approach greatly assists in formulating the most efficient approach to fire attack. This has increases that chances of saving victims while minimising the loss of property.

The 3D approach is not the only innovation we have seen in the last 30 years. CAFS and PPV are also game changers in their own right. Unfortunately I have seen a tendency for innovators to fall in love with their approach and to ignore the potential benefits of the other innovations. Some PPV advocates think adding water-fog will generate excessive steam and some 3D purists think that adding air will intensify the fire. The fact is that when they are combined there is a synergistic effect that greatly increases the safety and efficiency of the operation!

I have been practicing combining 3D techniques with PPV for over 13 years and have witnessed firsthand how powerful this combination can be. I am currently looking as combining CAFS with 3D and/or PPV. One of the limitations with CAFS is that it has minimal cooling interaction directly with the accumulated gases. The cooling of the gases occurs mostly at the the heated surfaces. If CAFS internal attack was combined with PPV the heated gases are removed prior to entry and the linings can be very effectively cooled and buffered.

With knowledge, an open-mind and a desire for excellence you can adapt your tactics and tools to develop the safest and most efficient plan of attack.

With this approach everyone wins!!!

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Fire response on the listing Costa Concordia

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 21 January 2012
in Passenger Ship Fires · 0 Comments

The last thing the passengers and crew of the recent Concordia cruise ship disaster needed was the outbreak of a fire – the fact that there wasn't (or at least there weren't any fires reported), in itself was a miracle.


Not only would the presence of heat and blinding smoke have caused many obvious issues to those on board but the task of fighting the fire in a listing or tilted environment would be nearly impossible.

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What drives your actions?

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 15 January 2012
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

Firefighters are often faced with situations that require the ability to conduct an accurate size up, usually with limited information and in a compressed time frame.

If this is not challenging enough, the decisions made have the potential to endanger the lives of firefighters and may mean the difference between life and death for any persons that are trapped.

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QLFA Benefits: Passenger Ship Fires

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 05 July 2011
in Marine Fire Response · 0 Comments

QuickLay Packs and Passenger Ship Emergency Response Teams

Suitably trained ERT's armed with QLFA Packs are best positioned to combat, control and extinguish a fire on a passenger ship.

Click here for more information on passenger ships - The high-rise of the seas.

Weight of Attack

The initial response of the ERT is ideal to a fire on a passenger ship, then by using the QLFA Packs they can lay and deploy their hose almost instantly- resulting in a quick knockdown and minimal fuss.

Multilingual, multi-skilled

The QLFA Packs are designed to almost 'self-deploy' this takes out the need for frantic communication between broken language barriers. The ease-of-use of the QLFA Packs puts the power and flexibility of a charged length of fire hose in the operators hands- poised ready to advance and cut the fire off.

Water damage

The speed and flexibility that the QLFA Packs introduce to fire hose deployment results in the fire being contained and extinguished much quicker - reducing water usage and damage.

Rapid onset of smoke and heat

The ERT's rapid response and hose deployment rapidly contains the fire. By using good fire nozzle techniques the smoke can also be contained and cooled.

Close quarters hose deployment

The Lay Pack is designed to stretch hose as the distance is covered 'on-the-fly'. The Attack Pack is designed to deploy a full length of hose on the spot resulting in a coil of hose that can be effortlessly advanced towards the fire.

Evacuee movements

The resulting coil from the Attack Pack maintains its form while under pressure. It can be stood up against a wall to allow evacuee's to exit with reduced trip hazards.

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Fires & Passenger Ships - The 'high-rise' of the seas

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 03 July 2011
in Marine Fire Response · 0 Comments

The #1 most feared cause of death is by fire... #2 is 'death-by-shark', so it stands to reason that a fire on a ship isn't anyones idea of fun!

Cruise ships and ocean liners are laden with a mix of flammable substances, hazardous materials and multilingual staff and guests, all of which can be managed individually in an emergency. However, with the reality of smoke and heat stimulating panic, the end result of a fire on a vessel can be catastrophic.

The situation is complicated dramatically when the fire is aboard a passenger ship, this is due to many factors. We have already looked at the fact v's fiction portrayal of fire that Hollywood is guilty of skewing in each blockbuster, this brutal introduction to the reality of the rapid onset of heat and smoke is a rude awakening for the hundreds, potentially thousands of multilingual passengers and a crew with little to no real fire fighting experience.

Even a small fire can cause significant issues as the fire fighting water can cause permanent damage requiring guest re-location or electrical problems resulting in malfunctioning lights and amenities.

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