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Public Statement

Posted by QLFA Staff
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on Thursday, 08 October 2015
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In about 2006, Fire & Rescue New South Wales commenced a project known as the “Reverse Hose Lay Project”.

As a result of that project, Fire & Rescue New South Wales developed a new firefighting technique called the “Combination Hose Lay Technique”, which involves laying a hose from the fire to the water source and new devices called the FRNSW Attack Bags or Packs and Lay Bags or Packs.

Innovation Realisation Pty Ltd, QLFA IP & L Pty Ltd, Emergency Services Technology Ltd, Quick Lay Fire Attack Pty Ltd, directors and associated persons each acknowledge that Fire & Rescue New South Wales developed, and is the owner of, the Combination Hose Lay Technique and the FRNSW Attack Bags/Packs and Lay Bags/Packs and all associated intellectual property.

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Cars on fire as motorway tunnel caves in west of Tokyo

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
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on Sunday, 02 December 2012
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Emergencies are largely unpredictable, the recent disaster inside a Japanese tunnel is a harsh reminder of this.

The deployment of hoses inside any restricted environment is a complicated task- let alone with evacuees moving and smoke and flames growing. Our packs are far more than some fabric holding the hose in place- they introduce a standard. This standard means the left hand knows what the right hand is doing.

If I have the blue Lay Pack my job is to find water and stretch the hose towards the fire. If I have the red Attack Pack then I need to be near to the fire and ready to charge the line to advance into fight the fire.

Read the story here

The Sasago Tunnel on the Chuo Expressway in Koshu, Yamanashi Prefecture, central Japan.

Picture: AP

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What Drives Your Actions Part 2. Going beyond routine and tradition.

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
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on Saturday, 24 March 2012
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If you want to want to be able to apply the most effective tactics, and choose the most effective tools and use them with the best possible technique, then you MUST have a sound understanding of fire behaviour. You must have a good knowledge of building construction and you must know the strengths and weaknesses of the tools available to you. No routine or robotic drill will ever will ever replace an strong understanding of fire behaviour, building construction and basic firemanship.

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Professionalism is a state of mind.

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
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on Sunday, 04 March 2012
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The general thinking has been that if you are paid to fight fires, then you are a “professional” firefighter. Does this mean that if you are retained or a volunteer that you are not professional? I believe that it depends on your definition of professional.

I have worked with “professional” and volunteer firefighters in several countries and I believe that I can say with some authority that the core values displayed by a “professional” has very little to do with how much you get paid, and a lot to do with how you think and behave.

I have met “volunteer” firefighters who display an extremely professional attitude and a high level of expertise. Unfortunately, there have been a few occasions where I have worked with full time paid firefighters who display a very “casual” attitude to all aspects of their profession. Some of these so-called professionals believe that after 4 years of service, any form of training is not only unnecessary, but also boring.

When it comes to attitude and core values I believe that there are only 2 types of firefighters. Professional or Unprofessional. Sometimes they are paid, partially paid, or unpaid. You can tell them apart by the following qualities.

Professional

Dedicated to serving the public.

Keen to learn new skills and always prepared to maintain skill levels.

Prepared to learn from mistakes.

Skilful and open to new ideas.

Displays expert knowledge and a desire to gain depth of understanding.

Works as a team player to provide the very best service.

Unprofessional

Self-serving.

Incompetent and unable or unwilling to admit it.

Think that they know all they need to know.

Blame others for their mistakes.

In a comfort zone that closes their mind.

Always looking for the easy job or position.


'It has been said that there is as much difference between a man who has not trained and cultivated his intellect and one who has, as between a dead man and a living, and the same contrast may be made between those who have not studied fire brigade work and those who have.'

Sir Eyre Massey Shaw 1868


Professionalism is a state of mind and the choice is yours!

Shan Raffel

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38 mm Vs 45 mm Hose

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 04 March 2012
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What are the advantage and disadvantages of using larger diameter hose?

“The pressure loss due to fiction varies as the square of the velocity.” In simple terms, as the velocity of water inside a hose increases, so does the friction loss. The increase is quadratic, so an increase in the flow by a factor of X will result in an increase in friction loss by a factor of X2. Therefore doubling the flow through a hose will quadruple the friction loss.

If we can reduce the velocity then we can reduce the pressure required at the pump and we can deliver more water over a greater distance.

 

Flow or ease of handling?

So therefore larger hose lines are better? Well it depends. Larger hoses are heavier to drag and harder to manoeuvre. The best solution is to use the smallest line that will deliver the required flow and pressure over the distance required.

Lets consider at situation where we need to supply a flow rate of 475 lpm to a nozzle at a tip pressure of 700 kPa.

For 38 mm hose we will have a friction loss of approximately 257 kPa per 30 metre length. (* Akron FireCalc).

Therefore if we need to deliver this water over 60 metres we will need to have a pressure of 1214 kPa at the pump. ie 700 kPa at the nozzle + (2 x 257 kPa)

If we use 45 mm hose we only need 167 kPa/30 metre length.

So for 45 mm hose we need a pump pressure of approximately 1034 kPa.

In both cases most pumps will be capable of supply the required pressure and flow. 38 mm hose will be easier to handle. If however the need to flow higher volumes of water or add more lengths, the pressure loss through 38 mm hose will be excessive.

It is important to consider your particular application and then choose the hose lay pack that will best suit your needs. The Quick Lay Fire Attack Team have the expereince and the knowledge to ensure you end up the most efficient hose lay combination for YOUR NEEDS!

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Seconds Count

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 26 February 2012
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The 3D approach to compartment fire fighting has reached the stage where most of the fire services in the world have adopted at least some of the training principles, tactics and techniques.

As an obvious believer and regular practitioner I can tell you from experience when executed efficiently the effect of the most appropriate nozzle technique is powerful, instant and life saving.

 

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