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Door Entry Techniques

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Friday, 09 October 2015
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

Door Entry Techniques – Many variations

If you ask 5 firefighters about exactly how to perform door entry technique you will probably get about half a dozen different opinions. Many of these are very rigid and involve a set number of pulses with a specified cone angle.

I tend to take an outcome based approach. What are we trying to achieve?

Firstly we need to cool the gases and linings around us so that the smoke or flame that exits the door meets cool gases and moist surfaces. After reading the fire behaviour indicators we need to cautiously open the door and introduce water fog into the upper zone to cool those gases. The risk assessment conducted may indicate the entry is not possible. Or it may be necessary to repeat the process several times. How many pulses, their duration and angle will be largely dependent on the geometry of the compartment and the stage of fire development. High ceilings will require a narrower cone angle. I still believe in hitting the ceiling with a jet to dislodge any loose debris. This can also assist in cooling the gases particularly in the case of high ceilings.

Large spaces with a well developed fire will need to have medium to long pulsations to have any meaningful cooling effect.

Don’t forget that if you open the door and you can see the fire base it is ok to put water on it!!!! After all the purpose of gas cooling is to help us get to a point where we can put water on the fire. Some people forget that it is only a control technique suitable for small compartments.

If we teach firefighters WHAT needs to be achieved and WHY, they will be able to work out HOW.

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Water on the Fire

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, 17 December 2014
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

From our global interactions with many firefighters from the UK, USA, Middle East, Australia and beyond, there are two main schools of thought – the first being “I don’t care about fancy nozzles and techniques, I just want to get lots of water on the fire” and the other, “there’s no use getting lots of water on the fire if you don’t have well practiced and scientifically proven techniques”.

What’s common to both of these approaches is simply ‘water on the fire’ and no one can argue that this isn’t key to a good result when it comes to the task of fire fighting.

It doesn’t take many clicks on YouTube to find the arrival and first actions of firefighters being heavily criticised in the comments section. While the language can sometimes be colourful, the underlying message is usually “why did it take so long to get water on the fire?”

The speed and amount of water that gets to the fire or the weight-of-attack is dependent on many variables, with hose management being one of the main contributing factors and one we’re interested in at QuickLay Fire Attack. We have come to the conclusion that common to every incident, be it an oil rig, house or boat fire – there are two standard requirements in regards to managing hose.

These include:

  1. The need to stretch hose between the water supply and the smoke barrier or fire containment point and;
  2. The need to deploy enough hose into a coil so the firefighters can advance into the fire without becoming snagged or caught up by excessive friction caused by long lengths of heavy hose laid outside, up or down halls and stairs.

Stretching hose over a distance is a fairly straightforward task, however, under duress and in the dark it can sometimes end up in a mess of hose and not much distance covered. Straps will hold hose neatly; however, when the bundle is dropped or the load is partly deployed it loses its form and becomes a liability.

With increasing acceptance of the Cleveland Hose Load, also called the coil or the roundabout” hose load; it is possible to deploy enough hose close to the entry point, so it can be easily advanced into the fire. However, a hose strapped in the coil can be very temperamental, losing its form if dropped and can also suffer a catastrophic failure should one end inadvertently thread under one loop before the hose is charged.

Furthermore, while 30m/100ft of coiled hose is great, if two thirds of it remains coiled back at the standpipe even before the firefighters are through the door then there’s still the issue of dragging a lot of hose.

Purpose built fire hose deployment packs

Following four years of research and development while consulting with firefighters from all over the world we have created a suite of very simple packs that store and deploy hose in such a way that meets these two requirements while at the same time protecting the equipment in storage and transport. In addition, by design the equipment is ergonomic – being long and thin – and fits next to the firefighter’s breathing apparatus set, dramatically decreasing the impact of the load on the firefight- er’s centre of gravity.

Research and Development

Core to our testing was the importance of reliability – not in the drill yard but in limited visibility, high pressure and usually complex situations with gloved hands after a multi-level stair climb.

  • Stowage – Space is king on a fire engine so an underpinning design intention was to keep things tight and compact while not jeopardising the act of deliberately deploying the equipment.
  • Transport – ‘Bounce’ is the term we have used to describe what happens when a piece of equipment is seemingly secured however when carried it bounces and gradually comes loose and starts to hit knees, knock out teeth or cause unnecessary damage to the built environment.
  • Deployment – As already mentioned, the two packs have very clear roles and subsequently are packed differently so as to achieve their purpose. Critical to the success was the guarantee that all equipment will hold tight, however definitely deploy as and when expected.
  • Intuitive design – The role of each pack has been made very obvious. The pack that lays from the water supply is blue for water and the pack that deploys close to the entry point is red for fire. While this sounds obvious, it means fire fighters can perform their duties with the discussion being centred on the as-yet unknowns of the incident.
  • Implementation – To assist with the implementation and skills maintenance we have produced a phone-site (similar to a smartphone app), which will work on all devices so long as they’re connected to the Internet. Here we have packing, deployment and application demonstrations. This portal can be accessed at www.qlfanow.com
  • One size fits all – In order to fit all types and sizes of hose, nozzles, dividers/wyes and associated equipment we built in the ability to adjust pockets to fit as required.
  • Equipment – Depending on many variables, different departments run with different pieces of equipment and to accommodate this we have built in a removable cover for a gated divider/wye.
  • Operations – While the hose lay requirement is ultimately the same, no two incidents are. It is therefore important that firefight- ers maximise the capability of their equipment.

Attack Pack

  • Can stand up on its side and be held or lent against a wall
  • Can be deployed in a platform cage and advanced from within
  • Can be deployed then dragged fully in its coils
  • Will protect the hose ends from the hose load so as to avoid a thumb/overhand knot forming
  • Will not fall apart if dropped
  • Can store a coil that is big enough to expand into a kink-free coil yet pack down small enough that it’s easy to carry

Lay Pack

  • Stores a pre-connected gated-wye
  • Can be advanced from either end
  • Will not lose its form as the hose load lays
  • Can be dropped or thrown over a balcony or across a gap
  • Can be deployed lengths

Following this testing we have added a hose- securing strap and door wedge pockets as well as streamline pockets for other equipment specific to the department. While the two packs combine to provide what is easily compartmentalised as a “high-rise kit” they actually combine to form a system to deploy hose in any environment where there’s a need for a lot of hose quickly and not a lot of space to do it.

These include courtyards, hallways or even the top landing of aviation rescue stairs.

We are often asked to bolt on entry-tools and even a fire extinguisher and while this would be possible we feel and the general belief is these two packs combine to form a tool specific to the task of rapid and reliable fire hose deployment.

We want to avoid the tool morphing into a lesser performing tool-box with diluted applications.

With this understanding and the purpose designed equipment, firefighters can arrive and intuitively stretch and coil hose with the focus being on the true-unknowns of the job and hopefully get water on the fire fast.

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4 – 8 – 12 A Sliding Scale Approach to Optimal Flow Rates

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 07 September 2013
in Industry Insights · 2 Comments

There are a number of fire ground formula that are designed to assist fire officers in determining the flow rate required to gain effective control of a fire.

Most of these come back to floor area or volume and don’t take into account the stage of development or strategic objectives. I believe that the sliding scale model provides a more practical guide that considers the mode of attack as part of the guide for initial attack flow.

At the lower end of the offensive mode of attack, a flow rate of 4 lpm/m2 (similar to the recommendations from the Iowa formula) should be considered the minimal tactical flow rate. As we approach the marginal mode of attack, we should be looking at a minimum of 8 lpm/m2.

As we move toward the upper end of the defensive mode of attack, we should be looking at flow rates of 12 to 13 lpm/m2 (similar to the NFA formula).

To successfully apply the sliding scale approach, firefighters need to have sufficient knowledge and skill to conduct an accurate size up to determine the most applicable mode of attack.  Some may consider this an “advanced skill” and argue that the “safest approach” is to deploy hose lines capable of the maximum flow.

I advocate that size up is an “essential skill” or “core skill” and that realistic training must be utilised to develop these skills.

“Dumbing down” our approach to fire attack to the lowest common denominator (and the highest flow rate) does not achieve a greater level of safety and will never be a substitute for quality training.

Struggling with very large hose lines reduces mobility and increases physical strain. Over application of water can destroy the thermal balance which further reduces the chances of safely locating the seat of fire or occupants.

Gross over application is as inappropriate as trying to attack a well-developed fire with a small hose line.

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Why dont you use straps?

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 29 August 2013
in Water on the Fire · 0 Comments

"Why don't you just use straps?"

Is a question we sometimes get!

The best way to appreciate the bigger picture is to consider the value of a firefighter's helmet. I personally have worn my helmet for 12 years and for the first time only 3 months ago did it actually do its job and protect my head from a falling garage door while operating in an underground car park fire- absolutely saving my life.

For 11 or so years prior to this nothing fell on my head but the one time it did the total cost of the few helmets I've had paid for themselves with my life.

So yes, you can just use a set of straps and generally they will hold the hose...

But what if?

  • You trip and drop the load and it looses its form?
  • You want to throw the whole load across a gap to a boat or building and the exposed hose gets snagged?
  • You want to only deploy half the hose, not the whole hose, causing the remaining half to loose its form?
  • You want to be able to open the the locker on the pumper and know the load will definitely be good-to-go?
  • You need to deploy hose in poor visibility?
  • You arrive at a big job with people you've not worked with before and want to be tasked based on the pack you have - not a long discussion?
  • You want to feed the neatly packed hose through a gap or under/over a fence?
  • You're working with a crew you don't know and they have a different way of strapping the hose?
  • You just want to become really efficient with a dedicated piece equipment that's been tried and tested and designed for one task...

In these very possible scenarios straps just don't cut it.

In my last article I discussed the The Cleveland Hose Load and specifically why it's great as well as its inherent shortcomings-

If you add the use of straps there's a whole lot more to consider with the Cleveland Hose Load, most importantly:

  • The thumb knot or Overhand Knot.

The Attack Pack deliberately isolates the two hose ends from the main body of the hose, this prevents the catastrophic failure caused when one hose end pops under one or more coils forming a simple but show-stopping thumb knot.

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Keeping an Open Mind

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 21 July 2013
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

As a pioneer of 3D Firefighting tactics in Australia (since 1997) I have been privileged to see the benefits this approach has delivered to my colleagues as well as the people we serve. Along with increasing the safety of firefighters, the 3D approach greatly assists in formulating the most efficient approach to fire attack. This has increases that chances of saving victims while minimising the loss of property.

The 3D approach is not the only innovation we have seen in the last 30 years. CAFS and PPV are also game changers in their own right. Unfortunately I have seen a tendency for innovators to fall in love with their approach and to ignore the potential benefits of the other innovations. Some PPV advocates think adding water-fog will generate excessive steam and some 3D purists think that adding air will intensify the fire. The fact is that when they are combined there is a synergistic effect that greatly increases the safety and efficiency of the operation!

I have been practicing combining 3D techniques with PPV for over 13 years and have witnessed firsthand how powerful this combination can be. I am currently looking as combining CAFS with 3D and/or PPV. One of the limitations with CAFS is that it has minimal cooling interaction directly with the accumulated gases. The cooling of the gases occurs mostly at the the heated surfaces. If CAFS internal attack was combined with PPV the heated gases are removed prior to entry and the linings can be very effectively cooled and buffered.

With knowledge, an open-mind and a desire for excellence you can adapt your tactics and tools to develop the safest and most efficient plan of attack.

With this approach everyone wins!!!

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Inherently Dangerous

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 30 April 2013
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

Firefighters are called upon to work in some of the most hazardous situations found in our society.

No responsible employer in the developed world would consider allowing their firefighters to enter these hostile environments without adequate personal protective equipment. Indeed most countries have legislation that makes it mandatory to provide such protection to their employees.

Adequate training and safe systems of work are just as critical in ensuring that firefighters are not placed in unnecessary danger. Arguably one of the most essential skills is the ability to recognise the hazards and to be able to formulate the safest and most efficient method of fire attack.

The Home Office Health and Safety publication “Training for Hazardous Occupations”, HSE OP8 has this to say about firefighting:

“The activities which firefighters are required to perform can be frightening. They frequently must work at heights, they are exposed to heat and smoke and they may have to enter dark confined spaces for rescue work. Unless the firefighter has experienced the fears to which these conditions give rise and has learnt to control them, there is a risk that he will get into difficulties in the hazardous circumstances of the fireground and will himself need to be rescued. He must also rely greatly upon his colleagues and his officers to look after him in hazardous situations. He needs to be confident in their ability to do so. He needs to know that if he is given an order by an officer that an officer will have considered the firefighters safety before asking him to do the task. He must also be confident that the task is within his own capabilities if he is to approach it in the right frame of mind. Each of these aspects, control of fear, and confidence in himself and his colleagues and his officers can be developed in training, but only if the training is undertaken under realistic conditions which may well expose the firefighter to risk.

I would argue that realistic and practical training is as critical to firefighter safety as adequate PPE. Yet even today there are numerous examples of fire services that do not see adequate realistic training as essential.

Some see it as an optional extra or something that can be provided with lectures or the occasional wet drill in the station yard.

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Tunnel fire fighting

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 21 April 2013
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

During many firefighting operations there is sufficient space to bowl out coiled hose or to flake out hose from the pumper.

While many tunnels will have hose reels these are extremely limited and will not provide sufficient flow to attack a developed vehicle fire. Initial fire attack in tunnels will most likely be conducted by connecting a hose line to an outlet located somewhere in the tunnel complex.

It is therefore essential for firefighters to be able to carry lay flat hose to the scene. This may be very challenging in the confines of a tunnel for a number of reasons. It is likely that vehicles behind the incident will have to be abandoned.

This chaotic environment could make the task of stretching a line extremely difficult. If visibility is hindered due to smoke or the failure of emergency lighting the situation become even more difficult and dangerous.

Probably the most limiting environment for hose line deployment is in a rail tunnel. In many cases the distance between the carriage and the walls of the tunnel is extremely narrow. Footing is difficult due to the ballast and few rail tunnels are fitted with emergency lighting so visibility could be very limited.

The Attack Pack provides the possibility to easily carry the hose to the scene and allow for hose to be charged in a very narrow or congested space. The fact that the hose line does not need to be stretched out to be charged allows fire attack to commence earlier and connection to the hydrant provides a tenable anchor point.

As conditions improve, the coiled hose line allows for easy and reliable advancement of the line.

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“Advances in training and equipment for modern ERT's in isolated MHF and complex industrial facilities"

Posted by Tracy Fitzgerald
Tracy Fitzgerald
Tracy Fitzgerald has not set their biography yet
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on Tuesday, 26 March 2013
in Media Releases · 0 Comments

QLFA's MD Sebastian Jacobs will be presenting the Fire Engineering Conference hosted by the IFE, held in Noosa this April. http://www.ifeaustralia.org.au/newsandevents.html

The following excerpt was excepted:

This presentation will look at advances in training and equipment for modern ERT’s in isolated MHF (major hazard facilities) and complex industrial sites.

A lay-flat hose in scantily trained hands can sometimes be detrimental to the initial and subsequent actions of employees who turn ‘first responders’ in an emergency.

There’s no secret that water is the best combat agent for a fire and while the water volume and pressure are both very important, the most important variable is the speed at which the water actually reaches the fire. Kinks, friction points and heavy hoses combined with tangles all can delay this requirement.

While a first responder ‘responds’ with the best intentions, various human factors impact greatly on the end result - such as limited and varied experience, communication between multilingual operators, the forever-present occurrence of freelancing and the phenomenon of target fixation. Operationally, the deployment of lay-flat hose in the industry’s current standard configuration (either rolled or flaked) is not ideal for complicated environments such as restricted spaces, up or down stairs or in areas of poor visibility- all of which have a negative impact on the speed and reliability of hose deployment tactics.

By stripping the goal of efficient lay-flat fire hose deployment right back to the basics; as well as reviewing what external factors typically delayed getting water on the fire we were able to garner an understanding of what strategies could be adopted and what tactics could be standardised and simplified to achieve this goal consistently.

The identification of the two standard requirements present at any incident from oilrigs to house fires meant we were able to systemise the process and develop procedures to greatly improve the speed and reliability of lay-flat fire hose deployment with an added degree of flexibility that is not at a cost to deployment speed.

By combining the understanding of what is required with the tools to repeatedly tick these two fundamental boxes, first responders with limited ‘real fire’ experience can get water on the fire as quickly as the ground can be covered in any environment.

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Big Box Fire Attack

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Monday, 11 March 2013
in Industry Insights · 6 Comments

After looking at the tactics used at a number of big box fires in my own city (Brisbane, Australia) in the last decade, I believe that once the accumulated smoke layer ignites the whole structure is going to be lost. Further, I believe that unless the seat of fire can be seen and quickly hit that we need to shift focus to preventing the accumulating un-burnt fuel from igniting in the over pressure.

The technique I have been promoting to cool those gases in the ceiling. I am NOT talking water-fog or pulses. We need big lines (minimum 64 mm) with a flow rate of at least 475 LPM. Must be set to a jet or it will not reach the ceiling. The objective is to rake the jet across the ceiling. The jet breaks up on striking the surface which cools the gases and the surfaces where they are hottest. Effectively we are trying to separate the gases above the fire from the un-burnt fuel in the remainder of the structure.

This will not put the fire out. It only buys time to locate and confine the fire. Attack needs to be initiated with at least 64 mm lines with good flow and a hard hitting jet to give maximum projection and striking force.

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Cars on fire as motorway tunnel caves in west of Tokyo

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 02 December 2012
in blogs · 0 Comments

Emergencies are largely unpredictable, the recent disaster inside a Japanese tunnel is a harsh reminder of this.

The deployment of hoses inside any restricted environment is a complicated task- let alone with evacuees moving and smoke and flames growing. Our packs are far more than some fabric holding the hose in place- they introduce a standard. This standard means the left hand knows what the right hand is doing.

If I have the blue Lay Pack my job is to find water and stretch the hose towards the fire. If I have the red Attack Pack then I need to be near to the fire and ready to charge the line to advance into fight the fire.

Read the story here

The Sasago Tunnel on the Chuo Expressway in Koshu, Yamanashi Prefecture, central Japan.

Picture: AP

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What Drives Your Actions Part 2. Going beyond routine and tradition.

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 24 March 2012
in blogs · 0 Comments

If you want to want to be able to apply the most effective tactics, and choose the most effective tools and use them with the best possible technique, then you MUST have a sound understanding of fire behaviour. You must have a good knowledge of building construction and you must know the strengths and weaknesses of the tools available to you. No routine or robotic drill will ever will ever replace an strong understanding of fire behaviour, building construction and basic firemanship.

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History & tradition + technology & innovation = progress

Posted by Peter Messenger
Peter Messenger
Peter Messenger has not set their biography yet
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on Sunday, 04 March 2012
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

I have always believed that history and tradition within a fire service is essential to providing effective emergency operations "they've done it this way for years and it seems to be working".

But sometimes emergency services should take a closer look, was it done as best as we can do or is there a better, smarter way?

As technology etches it way into fire fighting and emergency response, some traditions are best left in the fire fighting museum- the introduction of Breathing Apparatus for example- what was once considered something a 'sissy' would wear is now considered essential personal protective equipment.

 

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Professionalism is a state of mind.

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 04 March 2012
in blogs · 0 Comments

The general thinking has been that if you are paid to fight fires, then you are a “professional” firefighter. Does this mean that if you are retained or a volunteer that you are not professional? I believe that it depends on your definition of professional.

I have worked with “professional” and volunteer firefighters in several countries and I believe that I can say with some authority that the core values displayed by a “professional” has very little to do with how much you get paid, and a lot to do with how you think and behave.

I have met “volunteer” firefighters who display an extremely professional attitude and a high level of expertise. Unfortunately, there have been a few occasions where I have worked with full time paid firefighters who display a very “casual” attitude to all aspects of their profession. Some of these so-called professionals believe that after 4 years of service, any form of training is not only unnecessary, but also boring.

When it comes to attitude and core values I believe that there are only 2 types of firefighters. Professional or Unprofessional. Sometimes they are paid, partially paid, or unpaid. You can tell them apart by the following qualities.

Professional

Dedicated to serving the public.

Keen to learn new skills and always prepared to maintain skill levels.

Prepared to learn from mistakes.

Skilful and open to new ideas.

Displays expert knowledge and a desire to gain depth of understanding.

Works as a team player to provide the very best service.

Unprofessional

Self-serving.

Incompetent and unable or unwilling to admit it.

Think that they know all they need to know.

Blame others for their mistakes.

In a comfort zone that closes their mind.

Always looking for the easy job or position.


'It has been said that there is as much difference between a man who has not trained and cultivated his intellect and one who has, as between a dead man and a living, and the same contrast may be made between those who have not studied fire brigade work and those who have.'

Sir Eyre Massey Shaw 1868


Professionalism is a state of mind and the choice is yours!

Shan Raffel

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38 mm Vs 45 mm Hose

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 04 March 2012
in blogs · 0 Comments

What are the advantage and disadvantages of using larger diameter hose?

“The pressure loss due to fiction varies as the square of the velocity.” In simple terms, as the velocity of water inside a hose increases, so does the friction loss. The increase is quadratic, so an increase in the flow by a factor of X will result in an increase in friction loss by a factor of X2. Therefore doubling the flow through a hose will quadruple the friction loss.

If we can reduce the velocity then we can reduce the pressure required at the pump and we can deliver more water over a greater distance.

 

Flow or ease of handling?

So therefore larger hose lines are better? Well it depends. Larger hoses are heavier to drag and harder to manoeuvre. The best solution is to use the smallest line that will deliver the required flow and pressure over the distance required.

Lets consider at situation where we need to supply a flow rate of 475 lpm to a nozzle at a tip pressure of 700 kPa.

For 38 mm hose we will have a friction loss of approximately 257 kPa per 30 metre length. (* Akron FireCalc).

Therefore if we need to deliver this water over 60 metres we will need to have a pressure of 1214 kPa at the pump. ie 700 kPa at the nozzle + (2 x 257 kPa)

If we use 45 mm hose we only need 167 kPa/30 metre length.

So for 45 mm hose we need a pump pressure of approximately 1034 kPa.

In both cases most pumps will be capable of supply the required pressure and flow. 38 mm hose will be easier to handle. If however the need to flow higher volumes of water or add more lengths, the pressure loss through 38 mm hose will be excessive.

It is important to consider your particular application and then choose the hose lay pack that will best suit your needs. The Quick Lay Fire Attack Team have the expereince and the knowledge to ensure you end up the most efficient hose lay combination for YOUR NEEDS!

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Seconds Count

Posted by Shan Raffel
Shan Raffel
“Shan has pioneered and championed a global paradigm shift in fire fighting tech
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 26 February 2012
in blogs · 0 Comments

The 3D approach to compartment fire fighting has reached the stage where most of the fire services in the world have adopted at least some of the training principles, tactics and techniques.

As an obvious believer and regular practitioner I can tell you from experience when executed efficiently the effect of the most appropriate nozzle technique is powerful, instant and life saving.

 

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QLFA & Emergency Response Teams

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 26 February 2012
in Emergency Response Teams (ERT) · 0 Comments

The fire fighting industry has evolved slowly but surely to a point where the role of a “fire” fighter has diversified into rescue, hazmat and most significantly now prevention.

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The Stage is Set

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, 15 February 2012
in QuickLay Around the World · 0 Comments

After 6 months of planning we are ready to circumnavigate the globe.

Starting in Hong Kong we will meet the Hong Kong Fire Brigade. Then into Thailand and onto Nepal where we will meet the Chief from Katmandu's fire brigade. Next stop is Dubai where we will base ourselves for a few Middle Eastern visits then it's next stop London to meet London Fire Brigade.

Paris, Madrid, Croatia, Northern Europe will all be visited over the ensuing three weeks.

The return home will be through New York, Seattle, Hawaii and Guam.

It will be an experience!!!

 

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QLFA Monthly - February

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 09 February 2012
in QuickLay Monthly · 0 Comments

QLFA Monthly

qlfa monthly february

Click here for the February edition of our monthly newsletter.

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Deploying hose lines in tunnels

Posted by Sebastian Jacobs
Sebastian Jacobs
Keen Australian based fire fighter
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 29 January 2012
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

Lay Flat fire hose deployment in open spaces is quite a straight forward task. But inside a tunnel is a completely different story.

 

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What it means to be Emotionally Intelligent (EQ)

Posted by Peter Messenger
Peter Messenger
Peter Messenger has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 22 January 2012
in Industry Insights · 0 Comments

Emotional intelligence has been around for a long time – but with many different theories of what it is, not a lot of people have a thorough understanding of what it actually alludes to.

The reality is, emotional intelligence can be the difference between a great day at work or an extremely stressed one – and when applied to the fire ground it could even be the difference between life and death and/or serious injury.

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